maximum potential

these are the thought starters, insights, and inspiration to get you, and the brands you manage, to reach your maximum potential

social media is not a replacement

today i am reminded of how important face to face interaction is and that, if not careful, we may let social media and other forms of technology replace much needed human interaction.

as the residential concierge manager called me today to talk about my post concerning my residential experience at the westin book cadillac, the strongest thought running through my mind was that i never gave him the opportunity to respond to my concerns, thoughts and ideas until after he saw the post (along w/ the rest of the world). i should have told him first.

would that have changed my post? probably not completely because i still carried 25 shirts and 2 pairs of pants to the dry cleaners at work instead of doing it at the hotel today. but maybe it would have altered some things. maybe had i known that the house accounts do work everywhere or that the wbc coffee shop has a great surprise for residents starting monday my post would have been a lot shorter. Of perhaps had I remembered that there are some great people there working on the residents’ behalf my tone would have been different.

the lesson: online relationships are important, but so are offline relationships. as marketers, consumers, people, and humans we must not allow email, text messaging, and social media to replace the offline human connection that it replicates so well (but not perfectly).

dentyne’s recent campaign around this idea is quite timely. thanks dentyne, for reminding me where it all started. (for an added surprise, go to their web site and see how long they let you stay on: http://www.dentyne.com/)

Advertisements

Filed under: business branding, lifemark, , , , , , ,

4 Responses

  1. theelephantintheroom says:

    Sounds a lot like my concerns i expressed to you back in the CO…, no?

    • Detavio says:

      you are absolutely right. however, the answer is not to eliminate technology or social media either. social media enables us to do what humans do naturally anyway, which is to communicate. with that increased communication there will be both positives (new innovations as ideas benefit from the wisdom of crowds as opposed to being created in solitude–on an even more personal note it enables you and i to communicate, right?) and negatives (increasing demands on our time, which we never get more of so other things will have to give). the takeaway is not to hate technology/social media, it is to remember that there is balance and equilibrium in there somewhere. the same way we can’t always run to people for the answer, neither can we run to technology or social media for everything.

  2. jne says:

    The Dentyne spot is a clever one, but I had a problem with their website. It felt like a disappointing marketing stunt, complete with a ticking clock and annoying messages about how much “time” I had left and what I should do with it. What authority does this brand have to tell me how to spend my time—online or off?

    When I hit the contact link to tell them how full of it they are, the Dentyne “Consumer Relations Feedback Form” popped up, exposing the brand for what it is—a corporate entity trying to look cool in the digital space. I, of course, left immediately.

    What’s the long-term cost of irritating someone online?

    • Detavio says:

      jne,
      i am conflicted about this one. while i am completely against brands shouting at people/consumers and telling them what to do all of the time, i am not opposed to brands standing for something and integrating signs of that stance throughout all of our interactions, especially when that something is positive. dentyne’s stance runs contradictory to pop culture and i, personally, think it is a good one. sure they will irritate some people, but as a consumer i have the freedom to decide whether i align with their values or not (and therefore whether i participate or not). and at the end of the day, i think dentyne is right…i shouldn’t spend more than 3 minutes on a gum web site.

      (i completely agree with you in regards to the feedback form.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

get this blog in your email…

get this blog in your rss feed…

connect with me on…

my tweets…

%d bloggers like this: